Amorgos | Cyclades

36.839267° N, 25.882363° E

Amorgos

A granite island rising dramatically out of the Aegean, Amorgos became famous during the late '80s through Luc Besson's “Big Blue” for its spectacular waters and rugged beauty.  Since then, not a lot has changed. Because it is relatively difficult to reach (it takes around 7 hrs to get there by ferry from Pireaus and there is no airport), Amorgos has remained unspoiled by mass tourism. The bars are small but fashionable, the restaurants are family owned and the pace of life is blissfully slow. 

The setting is stunning. The steep, sunbaked coast of the south-east and the inland mountains give way to the gentler landscape to the northwest, where the island's two ports are nestled.

The town of Amorgos sits on top of a hill, overlooking the port of Katapola. True to the Cycladic aesthetics, the architecture is perfectly attuned to the barren landscape with clusters of white-washed cubes clinging onto rocky slopes, affording spectacular views of the Aegean.   

Amorgos Highlights

Monastery of Chozoviotissa

This is one of the country's most impressive monasteries, it's 8 floors clinging onto a 300 metre high sheer cliff. Legend has it that the monks originally planned to build the monastery at a different location, but the building materials were miraculously moved there. Don't let the 300 steps that lead to the monastery put you off; both the building (and its exhibits), and the spectacular view, will more than make it up to you.

Chora

Strolling around the narrow alleyways of Amorgos is an experience on its own. Situated at the mid-south of the island, the brilliant white houses and streets of Chora contrast sharply with the soothing blues of the earth and sky, composing a scenery of awe-inspiring beauty. The village's little streets, bursting with colourful bougainvillea and geraniums, are dotted with charming cafes and tavernas where you can join the cheerful buzz of chatting and clinking glasses.

Aegiali and Katapola

The island's two ports, each have their own distinct character and colour. In Katapola, time seems to slow down. The village's relaxing vibe is contagious, soon enough you will feel like you don't have a worry in the world. Come night-time, Aegiali's colourful bars buzz with activity as people of all ages sip their cocktails under the starlit sky. If you're lucky enough, you might come upon an open-air concert on the pier where the sail-boats dock - make sure not to miss it.

Hiking and rock climbing

If you are a fan of the outdoors, Amorgos is the perfect place for you. The island boasts 50 climbing routes and countless trails that make for world-class climbing and hiking. Add to that the spectacular views, and you have a truly memorable experience. Amorgos also offers geocaching games - an outdoor treasure hunt throughout the island.
What to do & see in Amorgos

They say that luxury is in the little things; there is no place where this is truer than Amorgos.  

Amorgos has the easy-going, relaxing vibe of a place where life is simpler, and people know how to enjoy the small things - tasting local delicacies at family-run tavernas, enjoying a drink in a candlelit bar, having a coffee under the shade of a tree to hide from the mid-day Mediterranean sun, or simply passing the time by gazing out at the at the wild beauty of the Amorgos landscape or the deep blues of the surrounding sea. 

Aside from offering life in the slow lane, Amorgos offers some first-class sightseeing and activities. The monastery of Chozoviotissa, built 1.000 years ago, hosts an interesting collection of artefacts. You can also visit the Byzantine church of Agios Ioannis Theologos, the chapel of Agia Triada and the church Panagia Katapoliani. In Chora, you will find the archaeological museum, which hosts a brilliant collection of pieces that date back up to 4.000 years ago. 

Hiking in Amorgos is a unique experience, not least because of the mesmerising views to be seen from the island's well-organised trails. One of the paths takes hikers through a cultural journey of 4.000 years, linking the two ancient cities of Minoa and Arkesini, with their churches and Byzantine frescoes.

Rock-climbers will find 50 excellent climbs on the mountain opposite Langada.  Amorgos also offers excellent diving sites, its seabed dotted with ancient shipwrecks and reefs.  

Best beaches in Amorgos
Agia Anna Maybe the most famous beach of the island, as it was a setting for the film The Big Blue. This is a rocky bay with pebbles and spectacular waters, close to the Monastery of Hozoviotissa.
Agios Pavlos A pebbly beach with calm, crystal clear waters close to the bay of Aegiali. There is a taverna close to the beach.
Agios Pandeleimon A rocky bay with small parts of sand and crystal clear waters, close to the village of Katapola. The bay took its name from the chapel that was built there.
Kato Kambos A picturesque natural harbor close to the village of Kolofana. There are no organized facilities, so visitors need to bring their own food and water.
Levrossos A sandy bay with crystal clear waters that is accessible by small transfer boats, or by car. There is a tavern, and the beaches of Xoklakas and Psili Ammos are within walking distance.
Maltezi A sandy bay with crystal clear waters close to Katapola. The beach is organized, and offers sunbeds and a beach-bar.
Mikri Glyfada Perfect to get away from it all, this secluded cove offers brilliant clear waters and perfect tranquility.
Mouros A superb pebbled bay with dazzling turquoise waters. Snorkelling fans can explore the underwater caves. There is a taverna and a cafe nearby.
Nikouria A small uninhabited islet close to Agios Pavlos, 5km off the port of Aegiali. There are 3 sandy beaches with calm turquoise waters and a beach bar.
Paradisia A small sandy bay backed by rocks that create natural shade, with beautiful waters. The beach is isolated and has no facilities, so visitors need to bring their own food and drink.
Psili Ammos A long sandy stretch with brilliant blue waters, best accessible by sea. There are no organized facilities, so visitors need to bring their own food and water.
How to get to Amorgos

Amorgos has no airport, so you can take a ferry from Piraeus to one of the two ports, Aegiali or Katapola. The ride lasts about 7hrs. You can also catch a flight to Santorini or Naxos and then take a ferry from there. There are regular routes connecting the islands during high season, however be sure to check the connections, especially during off season.

Where to stay in Amorgos

Resembling a mountain plan ted amidst the Aegean Sea, the morphology of Amorgos makes it ideal for endless sea-gazing and daydreaming in a holiday villa with pool. Luxury villas in Amorgos are not difficult to find as the island is one of the biggest ones in the Cyclades welcoming thousands of guests every year. The Greek Villas’ selection of luxurious private villas will meet the needs of all those looking for the best holiday villas to rent.